Tag Archives: graphic recorder

Purposes of a Graphic Record – Health Education North West (HENW) NHS

Graphic Recording (Visual Notes) are increasingly being used across different sectors and different organisations large and small. This in no accident. In an age of complexity of information, there has never been a greater need for ensuring strong and focused conversations. There are many needs for these conversations including; sharing information, developing innovation, building time to think, time to analyse solutions and much more. Graphic recording in a meeting or event has a number of purposes and roles in supporting these conversations and offer a range of benefits.

Health Ed North West for EVwebsite

150317 HENW Ed Transform.RoomView.SMALL JPEG

graphic facilitation. Graphic recording

Recently Health Education North West (HENW) brought together people involved in developing and training some core roles within the NHS workforce. HENW were keen to maximise the potential of the day and commissioned a live graphic record, the record below, it was created live during the event and follows the flow of the content and conversations of the day. This graphic record is a great example of some of the purposes and benefits they can add to meetings or events.The focus of the event was to look at how learning environments were needing to transform to reflect the real and changing world and how services and the networks of practitioners need to collaborate creatively to face these challenges and changes. The first intention or purpose for this graphic record was to bring the stream of conversations together from throughout the day to support people to literally see connections across the day; to help create a visual record and summary of the day that was visible to everyone.

Equally the graphic record acted to create a great focal point during the day where many conversations ensued in the breaks instigated when colleagues came together to browse the emerging record. When the event was over the graphic record was then available in a second life to remind people of what was covered and to keep the learning and conversations alive.

The reach of the graphic record was then extended to many people who weren’t at the event. The graphic record is a condensed and accessible way to communicate a synopsis of the day to those not there. In this way, the graphic record now acts as a conversation starter and encourages a wider inclusion of people to continue and enter the dialogues started at the event.

Whilst a graphic record is intended to be eye catching the absolute focus and intention is to create a visual record that can reach these purposes (and others). So eye catching yes, but always with this clarity of purposes; to convey and distil content, to enable sharing of the content and to encourage people to take the content and take it further… to the next conversations, the next events and maybe to the next graphic record.

Harvard Business Review. Vision Statement: Tired of PowerPoint? Try This Instead.

A Fresh Look at “Marketing Myopia” Graphic recorder Stephanie Crowley depicts the central themes of the classic 1960 HBR article by Ted Levitt.

by Daniel McGinn and Stephanie Crowley

Text by Daniel McGinn; illustration by Stephanie Crowley

For a big client meeting in April, Accenture senior manager Mark Papia hired a type of practitioner he’d never encountered before: a “graphic recorder.”

During the session, artist Julie Stuart drew large murals depicting the participants’ discussion on 4-foot-by-8-foot sheets of paper. The goal: to help people make connections and better recall key points. “The artwork generated a tremendous amount of interaction,” Papia says.

Graphic recording—also called visual facilitation—has been around since at least the 1970s, when it was popularized by a group of San Francisco architects. It’s grown lately, driven in large part by PowerPoint fatigue. The wall-sized depictions can be captured digitally and distributed widely by e-mail, and serve not just as meeting summaries that get stuffed in folders but also as visual references for key goals or processes. “I want somebody who hasn’t been in the conversation to be able to look at something I’ve done and quickly digest the key points,” says San Francisco artist Bree Sanchez.

Does It Work?

Professor Martin Eppler of the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland has studied how well visual representations boost recall. He found that graphic recording trumps PowerPoint slides, particularly if people feel invested in the drawings. “You remember best what you’ve created yourself,” Eppler says. With PowerPoint, presenters make the slides in advance; it’s not interactive or participatory. With graphic recording, all participants actively contribute ideas to the image, so they feel that their hands are in it.

However, Eppler’s research suggests that software programs that let participants create their own visual representations—Let’s Focus or SmartDraw, for instance—may be more effective than a pricey artist’s handiwork. (Experienced professionals charge from $1,000 to $3,500 a day.)

What Companies Say

Companies using the technique include HP, Dell, S.C. Johnson, and Charles Schwab. Kraft Foods has been utilizing graphic recording in its leadership training program since 2005. “For me, the drawings are really a trigger,” says Nicole Polarek, associate director of organizational development. “I can look at the picture and remember the conversation.” Jason Dirks, Kraft’s director of training, says graphic recording keeps people interested and engaged on two levels. “You have this initial ‘wow’ factor while watching this person draw the image,” Dirks says, and afterward people can study the depiction more closely. “The artists are able to capture a lot of depth.”